Table of Contents

Introduction

Transport infrastructure impacts nearly every consumer in Ireland and has a rippling impact on other industries on retail and more. Public transport is often advocated as a solution to climate change and other public issues, however it is still not the dominant form of transport in Ireland. In this insight report, we look at what transportation Irish consumers use and prefer along with their attitudes towards it. 

This research was gathered from 1,061 respondents aged 18 to 55-year-olds in the Republic of Ireland. Out of our 1,061 respondents, 37.7% live in suburban areas. Another 34.02% live in urban areas, while 28.28% of respondents live in rural areas. 

Row chart of the geographical area in which respondents live, with 37.7% of respondents saying "suburban".

Vehicles

86.82% of respondents own or belong to a household that owns an automobile (e.g. a car, motorcycle or van). 68.99% of respondents also own a drivers license. 

Car / Van / Motorcycle is overwhelmingly the most preferred mode of transport, with 65.98% of respondents indicating so. The next highest mode of transportation is bus with only 9.24% of respondents preferring it. In a typical week, 37.29% of respondents spend between €0 to €25 on petrol. This is followed by 33.71% who spend €25 to €50 and then 16.76% who spend €50 to €75. Approximately, 12% of respondents spend more than €75 each week on patrol.

Public Transport

Interestingly, 36.29% of respondents state they never take public transport in a typical week. Approximately 1 in 4 take public transport less than once per week. Less than 10% take public transport a few times per day. Considering that over a third of respondents never take public transport, it is unsurprising that over 69% of respondents spend less than €10 on a typical week on public transport. Less than 1.5% of respondents spend more than €50 on public transport in a week. 

The most popular occasion that our respondents take public transport for is visiting the shops / town centre / city centre, with half of respondents stating so. A third of respondents (33.24%) use public transport for seeing friends and family, followed closely by 32.02% of respondents who use public transport for commuting to and from work. 

Row chart of the occasions respondents take public transport for, with 50% using public transport to visit shops / town centre / city centre.

29.76% of respondents rate the public transport infrastructure where they live as “good”. 23.45% of respondents rate it as “poor”. 15.44% of respondents rate local public transport as “very poor” compared to 11.86% who rate local public transport as “very good”.

Bar chart of the ratings of public transport infrastructure where respondents live, with 29.76% of respondents selecting "good"

We also asked the question “If you were to change one thing about public transport in Ireland, what would it be?” to our respondents. Some of the most common responses were the following:

  • Increase the frequency and routes
  • Make it cheaper
  • Better late night transport
  • More transport in rural areas 
  • Increased punctuality and efficiency

Most Important Factors

We asked respondents the following question “When choosing ANY mode of transport, what are the most important factors you consider? Please rank in order of importance!”. Convenience is the most important factor to 32.77% of respondents when choosing any mode of transport. Another 22.5% chose cost, and then 19.87% chose speed. Weather conditions had the highest portion of lowest preferences, followed by the occasion. 

Key Takeaways

  • Cars are still the most dominant form of transportation in Ireland with 86.82% of respondents owning or belonging to a household that owns an automobile (e.g. a car, motorcycle or van). Cars / Van / Motorcycle are 6 times more popular compared to its closest transport mode. 
  • Convenience is the most important factor in relations to any transport mode, followed by cost. This reflects the most common responses on changes to public transport, cheaper fares and more frequency. 

Leave a Reply